Haibike Xduro Carbon 2015

Haibike presentó su primera E-Bike de doble suspensión en el año 2011 y en los últimos años ha seguido apostando muy fuerte por este tipo de modelos, por lo que hoy en día creo que la marca es mas conocida por sus E-bikes que por sus modelos de MTB... "La Experiencia es un Grado" y esto es algo que podemos comprobar en su catálogo 2015, con un par de modelos de Enduro con unos recorridos muy elevados y con la primera E-Bike de XC fabricada en fibra de carbono, que es el modelo que voy a analizar en esta entrada. La nueva Haibike Xduro utiliza un motor Bosch, tiene 120mm de recorrido y un sistema tipo FSR con roldana Idler muy bien optimizado...
Como podéis ver en la tabla de Excel y en las primeras gráficas el sistema FSR con roldana Idler de la Haibike Xduro Carbon tiene un funcionamiento impecable, con un porcentaje de Anti-squat siempre en torno al 110%. La Roldana Idler es concéntrica al punto de giro principal y esto en un sistema monopivote no suele dar buen resultado, pero si utilizamos un sistema tipo FSR y ajustamos bien la posición del Horst Link podemos conseguir un porcentaje de Anti-squat ideal, un Pedal-Kickback (6º) muy reducido y un porcentaje de Brake-squat (68%) bastante bajo. 

En la gráfica del Leverage Ratio vemos como el sistema es Progresivo-Regresivo (2.4-2.3-2.4), aunque simplificando un poco podemos decir que el sistema tiene un funcionamiento completamente lineal. Este modelo está enfocado claramente hacia un uso tipo XC por lo que en principio no necesita un LR demasiado progresivo. El cuadro utiliza un amortiguador Fox Float CTD de 190x51mm con cámara de aire HV, pero si alguien está pensando en darle un uso un poco mas intenso siempre tiene la opción de reducir el volumen o de instalar un amortiguador un poco mas agresivo... El cuadro admite un amortiguador con depósito y creo que el funcionamiento con un Fox Float X o con un RS Monarch Plus puede ser muy interesante. 

Un saludo.

5 comentarios:

Unknown dijo...

Of the e-bikes reviewed here (I congratulate you for having set such a cracking pace, Antonio) I think the Flyer, Powerfly and Xduro are looking to be the better bikes on the performance numbers. The Centurion Numinis also appears to be an interesting design.

The natural rearward wheelpath of most e-bikes (note the strongly raked chainstays) seems to offer something interesting that is in short supply on larger wheeled conventional MTBs. The wheelpath is achieved with very little kickback on the mentioned bikes and especially the Xduro. I assume the idler is responsible for this superlative AS/PK balance. I am warming to those ugly little things. Idlers certainly do seem to help to reduce the conflict between incommensurable design goals.

Un saludo
Chris

Antonio Osuna dijo...

Haibike has a Superb line of E-bikes, I'm preparing the review of the LT models and they are completely dialed... The Trek Powerfly looks solid too, it's very simple, but at the same time it looks just right. Moustache and Flyer have been a surprise and the new Nicolai E-Boxx it's really nice too: Custom Bosch motor, Upside down Battery, ION style layup, CNC everywhere... they have a ton of experience doing "crazy stuff" and they have done a really great job with this one.

Best regards,
Tony.

Unknown dijo...

Antonio, although its kind of academic, I can't help wondering what would happen if you de-electrified this bike and reimplemented it as a pedal driven machine. Imagine, for a moment, a standard Xduro with all the frame and linkage proportions remaining the same, and the idler also being present but with an alternative crankset, a 24T Hammerschmidt, say, being substituted for the electric motor. In this case, would the good kinematic and kickback numbers still be maintained?

I am not suggesting that the mentioned configuration, if viable from a kinematic point of view would be entirely satisfactory - the chainstay length of the Xduro is 465mm and that would be very strange for a pedal driven bike. But, solutions to that problem are imaginable. Radical surgery on the classical horst-link, after Specialized's recent reworking of the Demo linkages, is now very much on the agenda. I think an Xduro-inspired chainstay and drivetrain design but with revised frame mount point structure and positioning as well as crank and idler positioning could yield a compact linkage configuration that would be genuinely worthy of interest, assuming the larger chainring doesn't adversely impact the bike kinematics too much.

Un saludo
Chris

Antonio Osuna dijo...

"Hammersmith it's dead", and an Idler pulley works well with all types of cranks, so let's say we are going to use a standar 1x11 setup... Yep, it would work really nice and chainstays can be a lot shorter than what E-bikes are using. The bike you are talking about it's pretty much a Ghost DH9000 with less travel...

Best regards,
Tony.

Unknown dijo...

Yes, what I am thinking about is along those lines but with a sort of Vasttech-like twist. The anchored end of the chainstays would pivot from within the circumference of the rear wheel, but not in the horribly overdone way that Vasttech does it but rather by just pushing the Xduro and DH9000 style horst-link designs slightly in that direction.

There would be some structural issues to resolve, e.g. chainstay stiffness, in a linkage design of this sort but ways of resolving them are not hard to see.

Un saludo
Chris

 

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